The Atomic Mr Basie

hqdefault

When I was a wee boy in the 70’s and 80’s, you could turn on the TV and often hear and see jazz. Saturday night telly usually had one or two exponents of “Proper Grown Up Music” on a chat show; Buddy Rich, Sammy Davis Jnr, Sarah Vaughan amongst those I remember on Michael Parkinson’s show.  And jazz based music never seemed to be far away from the radio thanks to the ubiquitous BBC Big Band and presenters like Humphrey Littleton and Alan Dell on Radio 2. I don’t know where I first heard Count Basie and his Orchestra, but it was at a very early age and I knew that I loved the sound this band made, and knew from his name that he must be very important. As I morphed into a jazz obsessed teenager, it was the music of Basie’s band that drew me along, and that I return to time and time again. For me, it’s a sound that’s life affirming. My favourite incarnation is the band of the 50’s and 60’s, post war big band jazz at its best. The musicians and arrangers took all that they had learned from  the swing era and the birth of be-bop and took the music out of the ballroom and into concert halls and clubs. The Count Basie Orchestra was a streamlined jazz machine whose sections interlocked like gears and hit audiences with the force of a locomotive. The record executives compared it to a nuclear blast, and called it the Atomic Mr Basie. And the centre of it all is Basie’s spare, perfectly nuanced piano. What’s not to love?! This track is for music historian and author Richard Havers. Richard, lets try it one more once!